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Robert Marzano Suggests Ideas for Exit Tickets

(Originally titled “The Many Uses of Exit Slips”)

In this Educational Leadership article, author/consultant Robert Marzano lists four types of prompts for exit slips given at the end of a class:

Prompts to check for understanding – The teacher might ask students, “What are you most confused about regarding what we did in class today?” The slips might lead the teacher to re-teach a particular concept, break students into groups for help in different areas, and perhaps use expert students to run some of the groups.

Prompts to promote reflection – The teacher might ask students, “How hard did you work today and why?” or “What could you have done today to help yourself learn better?” and then follow up accordingly.

Prompts on instructional strategies – For example, “How did the group work today help you understand the content? What are some things you’d like to see during group work in the future?”

General teaching suggestions – For example, “What is something I should be doing to improve your understanding of the content?” Marzano says this sends an important message to students – “that everyone is a learner, even the teacher – and that there’s no shame in admitting you’re not doing well at something and seeking help.”

“The Many Uses of Exit Slips” by Robert Marzano in Educational Leadership, October 2012 (Vol. 70, #2, p. 80-81), www.ascd.org

Comments

Ginger Hunt
Oct 18, 2012

Great ideas for exit tickets! And...a great way to make it 21st century is to take the questions above, put them in a Google form, and place on a classroom Web site. Any time students have the computers out, they can finish the activity by taking the exit survey from the teacher's Web site. Tickets don't have to be printed and the responses will go into one spreadsheet! If anyone would like help putting this together just let me know! -Ginger

Thomas Green
Feb 5, 2013

• Prompts to promote reflection – The teacher might ask students, “How hard did you work today and why?” or “What could you have done today to help yourself learn better?” and then follow up accordingly.
This ties in nicely with our "How engaged were you today?" board and the conversations we have about working hard to get smarter. I used Heedong the other day with our classes and showed them his individual reading record to demonstrate this idea. He began reading almost near the middle of 2nd grade in August, and through his pushing himself successfully through 65 self selected books, ended up by January 31 consistently reading upper 4th-5th grade books. Sadly has moved back to Korea, but continues from there to access Raz Kids and continues to use it for nonfiction reading. Go Heedong!